Lethabo

im 22 years old, female doing my honns in ecological informatics at csir(pretoria)

Name:
Location: pretoria, gauteng, South Africa

i completed my Bsc (microbiology physiology) degree in 2005 at University of Limpopo, now im doing my honns in ecological informatics at university of the western cape.

Tuesday, May 16, 2006

HOW INSECTS FINDS THEIR SOUL MATES

Insects use different ways in order to attract their partners. Insects use sound, smell, colour and pheromones (is a chemical produced by an organism that transmits a message to the other members of the same species).

Pheromone is a chemical which is produced by living organisms that transmits message to other members of the same species. Insects produce a trail pheromone and some insects use pheromones to mark their path. The pheromones have to be continually renewed because they evaporate quickly. Some insects use pheromones in order to locate or find their mating partners.

Some insects like crickets, grasshoppers and cicadas use the process of stridulation (produce sounds by rubbing together two parts of their body) when attracting their mating partners.

Crickets males have a chirp (their wings have ridges that act like a comb or file instrument) which they use to attract the females. They chirp by rubbing their wings or legs over each other, and the song is specific. Crickets have two types of songs which they sang in order to attract their females. The songs are the calling song and a courting song. The calling song attracts only females and repels males, and the song is fairly loud. The courting song is used when a female cricket is near, and is a very quiet song. Female crickets have a long needlelike egg-laying organ (ovipositor).

Grasshoppers produce sounds when attracting their mating partners. They produce sound by sawing the notched edge of their hindlimb against the strengthened vein of the wing. Only the males are able to sing in order to attract females. After mating, the female cuts slits into the bark of a twig and deposits her eggs there. She may do so repeatedly, until she has laid several hundred eggs. When the eggs hatch, the newborn nymphs drop to the ground, where they burrow and start another cycle.

Cicadas attract their mates by vibrations. They have abdomens which have two chambers, the inner wall of the chamber is rigid and when the abdomen moves in or out it makes a click sound. There is a large muscle in the abdomen which pulls the wall back; the noise is amplified in the abdomen using a hollow vibrating plate and two hollow rectangular resonators. Sound is received from eardrums on either side of the thorax in cicadas, but grasshoppers use a membrane situated between two deep slits along their first pair of thighs. With each species having a unique sound, they can recognize and attract appropriate mates of the same species.

Moths, butterflies and mayflies display their colourful wings to attract their mating partners. Their wings have scales that have pigments and microscopic structures that split light and reflect different form of light rays displaying different kinds of colours. When they spread their wings they attract females but of the same species since females are less colourful than males so males are the ones who attract females. Moths use smell to attract mates (pheromones). Females produce chemical compounds called pheromones which male moths are able to detect with their large, feathery antennae but it had to continue producing the pheromone because it evaporates quickly.

Insects use different way in order to attract their mating partners or in finding their soul mates. Some animals use smell, sounds, displays beautiful colours and some use pheromones.

Reference:

1. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2006 May 7, 16:15 PTA [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pheromones
2. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2005 Sep 24, 16:53 [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stridulation&oldid=23924839
3. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2006 May 4, 14:55 PTA [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crickets
4. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2006 May 8, 03:48 PTA [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly
5. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2006 May 6, 15:20 PTA [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grasshopper
6. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2006 Apr 28, 18:49 PTA [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayflies
7. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2006 May 7, 09:49 PTA [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicadas
8. Wikipedia contributors. Council of Science Editors [internet]. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopaedia; 2006 May 8, 13:21 PTA [cited 2006 May 8]. Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moth

Lethabo Mosomane
CSIR
Pretoria
0001
Tel: 27 12 841 2133
Fax: 27 12 842 3676
mail: lmosomane@csir.co.za
http://lmosomane.blogspot.com

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